Interview with Commandant of the Intelligence School of Nigeria, Commodore Abdul Qader

How to pass on ideas of national security in a country of 160 million people

 An interview with the Commandant of the Intelligence School in Nigeria, Commodore Abdul Qader 

By Ephraim Lapid, Brigadier General (Res.)

The Intelligence Schoolin Nigeria, a militaryinstitution, is the country'shighest-level seniorintelligence institution. It is an integral part of theDefense Intelligence Agency (DIA), which reports directly to the Chief of Defense, the equivalent to a defense minister in Western countries. The school offers coursesand seminarsto nationalsecurity organizations: the military (Army, Navy, Air Force), the police, relevant governmentoffices(Foreign Affairs, Justice, Energy, etc.). At this institution it is fascinating to seerepresentatives ofgovernmental agencies and services (thosein uniformandthosein suits) holdingjoint discussionsand, in particular, creating a socialnetwork which helps to better coordinate performance in such a largeand complex country. We need to remember that Nigeria is the 8th most populous country in the world (about 160 million people) and covers 925,000 square kilometers, about 45 times the size of Israel. The School Commandant, Commodore Abdul Kader, points out with pride the remarkable professional ability developed in various courses and in the unique atmosphere of cooperation that exists among the students.

Nigeria's national security components

Nigeria's national security: is based on four pillars: military capability, foreign policy, society and economy.These are driven by the country's major national security goals: to defend the government and its institutions, to protect, the nation's natural resources (oil andotherminerals), to deal with domestic terror (of priority: pirates, kidnappings) and to fight against crime and corruption. Only recently was Nigeriasubjected tothreesuicide attacks carried out byglobal terrorists. As a result, Nigeria has become aplayer in the global fight against terrorism.

 Utilizing Military Retirees

Part of the school staff is comprised of army retirees. This is a result of the school's approach that experience of such professionals should be utilized for the benefit of the entire system. For example, in a national security course that took place recently, under the aegis of the Galilee Institute in Israel, the chief Nigerian official was Lt. Col. Odoma Odopia, who had retired three years ago after a long, period of career service. In Nigeria, military service is not mandatory, and the military system relies on professional personnel. There is, however, a form of National Service that is mandatory for 21 year-old university graduates. Those who serve in this service are stationed at various civilian and military units for one year.

 Abdul Kader (50), a Muslim who has visited Israel, has a very high esteem for the Israeli intelligence community. Another country which, he believes, is suitable for lesson learning and implementation is Brazil, which faces similar challenges. Because today's wars are asymmetric and global terrorism is so relevant to almost every country, it is even more important to utilize civilian agencies of national security (like the Police, Customs, the Foreign Office) and maintain international cooperation in the battle against terrorism. Just to illustrate how complicated matters are: Nigeria shares its borders with seven other countries in the Gulf of Guinea, all of which have to protect a vital and central area of oil distribution upon which the entire world depends.

 The Military-Media Relationship in Light of National Security

The school hopes to incorporate journalists into the student body of its regular courses,in order to strengthen the military system's relationship with the media. Nigerian people expect the media to express a deep understanding and sympathy with the country's values, and to be very considerate in its coverage, ideas which may sound remote to Israeli or other foreign ears. The military's relationship with the media also enables the conduct of Information Operations in support of various national needs. The media also have an important role in determining the population's morale.

מודעות פרסומת

Lithuanian parliament takes another step towards Jewish restitution

VILNIUS, Jun 16, BNS – Lithuania's parliament on Thursday took yet another step regarding compensation of 128 million litas (EUR 37.1 mln) for Jewish property nationalized by totalitarian regimes.
The bill on Good Will Compensation for Real Estate of Jewish Religious Communities was approved for discussion by 77 votes in support, seven against and eight abstentions. The parliament is yet to vote on adoption of the draft legislation.
Under the bill, the compensation would be transferred to a special foundation, the governing body of which would represent the Jewish Community in Lithuania, the Religious Jewish Community of Lithuania and other Jewish religious, health, cultural and education organizations.
Jewish organizations have not reached a unified position on the government-initiated law – a few Jewish rabbis have asked the Lithuanian Seimas to vote down the proposal, stating disapproval to the payment of money to a foundation that would involve Jewish organizations operating in Lithuania.
The presented draft has also come under criticism from an organization that called itself the Jewish Religious Community of Kaunas. It is not satisfied with the fact that a compensation would be paid, in its opinion, to "a mystical fund comprised of institutions and organizations that have nothing to do with the continuity of Judaism traditions, the history of Lithuanian Jews and Jewish religious communities."
Meanwhile, the Jewish Community of Lithuania backs the draft law stipulating that the Lithuanian government would pay 128 million litas in compensation for nationalized Jewish property in 2013-2023. The sum amounts to about a third of the value of all appropriated properties.
Authors of the draft said the law would demonstrate Lithuania's good will to restore historic justice, improve the relations between Lithuanian and Jewish nations, as well as state respect to human rights and commitments before the global Jewish community and international organizations. Furthermore, handover of relevant real estate would provide Lithuania with politically stronger positions in its talks with Russia on compensation of damages caused by the totalitarian regime.

Jewish reps thank Lithuanian administration for respect to old cemetery
VILNIUS, Jun 16, BNS – Representatives of the Jewish community on Thursday thanked the administration of Lithuania and Vilnius for the respect to the old Jewish cemetery.
“This is a day of triumph of democracy, when we see that negotiations and dialogue can solve conflicts by way of good will and understanding. This has been done between nations with different opinions, attitudes and religions," Rabbi Elyokim Schlessinger, chairman of the Rabbi Council of the Committee for the Preservation of Cemeteries in Europe, said at the ceremony of unveiling a memorial plaque at the former cemetery.
The ceremony next to the old Jewish cemetery of Snipiskes, a neighborhood in central Vilnius, was attended by Lithuanian Prime Minister Andrius Kubilius, Vilnius City Mayor Arturas Zuokas, other officials, foreign diplomats and representatives of the Jewish community.
Schlessinger expressed gratitude to Lithuania's government, embassies of the United States and the United Kingdom, the capital city's administration and residents.
In his words, it is a historic event when Vilnius can be recalled as a once center of Jewish life.
Faina Kukliansky, deputy chairman of the Lithuanian Jewish Community, said that, regardless of a far smaller population of Jews in Lithuania now, as compared with the pre-WWII era, "the independent state of Lithuania has preserved respect and understanding of the Jewish nation."
"On behalf of the Lithuanian Jewish Community, I want to thank all those who helped solving the long-term clash between the Jewish religious community and the state. (…) Today I want to deliver special thanks to director of the Cultural Heritage Department Diana Varnaite who translated into reality things that some wanted to see in theory," she added.
The Lithuanian prime minister said that Lithuania had succeeded in settling the disagreements.
"We are gathered here today to remind ourselves and the future generations about presence of a Jewish cemetery here 180 years ago, their importance to the Jewish community of Vilnius and the rest of the world. A few years ago, the Snipiskes Jewish ceremony was subject to heated discussions, however, together with the international Jewish community Lithuania was able to find ways of solving the conflicts and pay due respect to the important place," Kubilius said.
"For this I am thankful to (…) Rabbi Schlessinger and all those who brought us to the day of respect and memory," said the head of the government.
A few years ago, Lithuania was locked in a new scandal amid suspicions that new commercial building were constructed in the location of the old Jewish cemetery. The cemetery had been cleared by the Soviet administration, however, historians noted lack of clear evidence about removal of all remains.
In response to the criticism, Lithuania's administration had invited Jewish representatives to perform tests at the site in 2008. Following international tests and cartographic clashes, the vague outline of the cemetery was reborn in a green lawn. Lithuania's government approved the boundaries of the cemetery in 2009.
Cabinet representatives said Jews had agreed with the government-approved boundaries and did not object leaving the apartment buildings and the Sports Center located in the questionable territory untouched, although historic sources showed them within the cemetery boundaries.
The Jewish cemetery in central Vilnius were functional from the 16th century before they were closed in the 18th century.

Lithuanian PM to attend unveiling of memorial plaque at old Jewish cemetery in Vilnius
VILNIUS, Jun 16, BNS – Lithuania's Prime Minister Andrius Kubilius will attend a ceremony to unveil a memorial plaque next to the old Jewish cemetery in Vilnius on Thursday.
In the framework of the Year of Holocaust, Lithuania will complete immortalizing the memory of one of Europe's oldest destroyed Jewish cemetery. Lithuania came under international criticism a few years ago over protection of the site.
Kubilius said that the memorial plaque would send yet another sign of respect to the Jewish nation amid Lithuania's efforts to restore historic justice.
"Lithuania's history cannot be imagined without the Lithuanian Jewish community, which had left a deep imprint in our heritage since the era of Vytautas the Great," the prime minister told BNS via his spokesman.
"Holocaust undermined the Litvak community, however, Lithuania is today working to return the moral debt by restoring historic justice. The memorial plaque next to the old Jewish cemetery in Snipikskes is yet another small sign of respect to the Jewish nation amid the commemoration of 2011 as the year of memory of the Holocaust," Kubilius said.
Lithuania was locked in a new scandal a few years ago amid suspicions that new commercial building were constructed in the location of the old Jewish cemetery. The cemetery has been cleared by the Soviet administration, however, historians note lack of clear evidence about removal of all remains.
In response to the criticism, Lithuania's administration had invited Jewish representatives to perform tests at the site in 2008. Following international tests and cartographic clashes, the vague outline of the cemetery was reborn in a green lawn. Lithuania's government approved the boundaries of the cemetery in 2009.
Cabinet representatives said Jews had agreed with the government-approved boundaries and did not object leaving the apartment buildings and the Sports Center located in the questionable territory untouched, although historic sources showed them within the cemetery boundaries.
The Jewish cemetery in central Vilnius were functional from the 16th century before they were closed in the 18th century.

Office of the International Council of Jewish War Veterans moves from London to Israel

The International Council of Jewish War Veterans who fought against the Nazis in WWII on behalf of their countries was established after the war by 19 Jewish veteran organizations from five continents and its office was set up in London.
The council was very active in the past and from time to time held large-scale meetings and conferences, including at the Binyanei Ha'uma convention center in Jerusalem. As time progressed, the number of members decreased and many of the organizations in most of the countries stepped down their activity and some of them shut down. Jewish veterans are currently active in eight countries: the U.S., England, France, Australia, South Africa, Finland, Poland and Israel.
The council's elected chairman is Tzevet member Alexander Ziloni, who served during WWII with Britain's Royal Air Force and when the State of Israel was established, became the first head of the Israeli Air Forces GHQ. Alex was active in the British League of Ex-Servicemen and Women.
It was decided to move the Jewish veterans council office from London to Israel, as part of Tzevet, in order to reorganize and revitalize it.

A group of ZIFKRAS from Germany in a course in Israel – May 2011

A group of German reserve officers attended the Galilee College in Israel for an intensive week of know-how and tourism.
The group visited the Memorial site in Latrun and was hosted very friendly by the Home front Command of I.D.F.
I briefed the group at their visits in these sites and also briefed them on the relation between the  military  and the Israeli society.

Galilee College on youtube

Newsletter TZEVET

Dear friends, Attached an updated newsletter of TZEVET – The Organization of the Israeli Veterans. . You are invited to forward it to your friends and colleagues

Tzevet-VeteranNews_002

Integration of Jewish soldiers in Western armies – at a conference in Germnay

During the events marking the end of World War I (Nov. 1918), a conference was held a the Jewish center in Frankfurt, Germany, discussing the integration of Jewish soldiers in Western armies.

The initiation was by the union of Jewish soldiers of the German army. The heads of the union Col. Dr. Michael Berger, currently head of the department of history in the German armed forces, and his vice, Lt. Col. Dr. Gideon Römer-Hillbrecht. In the conference participated also representatives of military forces such as the USA, France, Swiss and Germany.

Brigadier General (res.) Ephraim Lapid represented Israel and pointed out the particularity of the most Jewish army, its values and Jewish moral previewed in different operations. Furthermore, he pointed out the fact that orthodox men and women do not serve in the army due to their religious limitations.

Prior to the conference a ceremony was held in memory of the hundreds of Jewish soldiers that were killed in World War I.

9/11/10

 

First form the right: Rabbi Moshe Hayun from the French army, in the center (the moderator): Lt. Col. Dr. Gideon Römer-Hillbrecht, next to him: Lt. Col. Rabbi Avi Weiss from the US army, in blue shirt: Brig. gen. (res.) Ephraim Lapid from Israel, first from the left: Lt. Col. Rolf Strum form the Swiss army. the others are from the German armed forces.

 

The Defence relationship between Germany and Israel – past, present and future – A book Launch in Germany, 2008